Septum Piercing: What is a Septum Piercing?

Septum Piercing

Septum Piercings have been around for a while however, it’s certainly one of the rarest places to be pierced. But more and more appear to be sporting their hoops through on the inside of their noses. It’s possible that this is not really true, but have you ever taken a hair from your nostril? It stings. Eyes are swollen. You cough. Perhaps, a piercing into your septum is a horrifying experience? We spoke to London the boutique of Maria Tash’s head-piercer Kevin Lamb, and Jeremy Fenton, MD from the Schweiger Dermatology Group in NYC to find out the whole story.

What is a Septum Piercing?

A septum piercing can be described as what it’s called–a puncture located in your septum, an area of your nose. The septum is a thin cartilage wall which runs across the middle of your nose, and separates the left and right nostrils. A septum piercing however, should not penetrate the cartilage. It must pass through the softer tissue beneath the septum. Piercers call it the “sweet area.”

In addition, even though deviated septum’s are quite normal but you’ll require a seasoned surgeon if you’ve got one. It could look odd if done incorrectly. “You can choose to pierce the septum by hand or with receiving tubes or by popping clamps on the septum,” Lamb says.

Pain and Healing Time

The discomfort associated with the septum piercing is different for each person but it’s certain to cause you to cry. This doesn’t mean that you’re crying. It’s an instinctual reaction to release tears after your nose has been punctured or pinched. Lamb said: “From clients’ experiences they usually feel it to be a rapid, sharp feeling, but after the needle has been removed and the jewelry is transferred the entire body relaxes and the feeling shifts to an overall feeling of warmth.”

According to Fenton the piercings will be much more comfortable after about eight weeks, but it can take between four and six months for the majority parts of recovery to occur. 1 “As as with any serious injury to the mucosal or the skin surfaces, it could be a while to heal the scar tissue until it has be at its maximum strength and therefore one must be wary of changing jewelry prior to.”

Cost of a Septum Piercing

Cost of a Septum Piercing

Similar to most cosmetic procedures that cost money, the price of the septum piercing is contingent on the location you go to as well as the state where you’re having the procedure. Expect to pay between $40 and $100.

Aftercare

In terms of the aftercare, Lamb says to follow the normal piercing cleansing procedure: “Saline-soak twice per day Dry the skin following not play, picking or twisting the hole and don’t try to knock it out!”

Your skincare routine must be altered during the post-care procedure. “When cleaning or moisturizing your surface of to the nose septum try to limit the use of soap or moisturizers close to the piercing” Fenton advises. Fenton. “You should avoid contact with soaps , creams or moisturizers which could get in the puncture.” The doctor also suggests staying away from hot tubs or baths as they can be the ideal breeding ground for bacteria.

However, there’s no reason to be concerned about changing your routine of skincare once the piercing is been healed. “The tattoo is located situated on the inside of the nose, so it should not be receiving applications of products frequently,” Fenton explains.

Side Effects of Piercing

  • Irritation and infections Fenton clarifies that the most important thing to consider when recovering from a piercing, is infection. “Monitor for any swelling, pus or an increase in discomfort. This could be a sign of an infection.” If you suffer from allergy symptoms that occur during the season or have a tendency to colds at certain periods of time, then you may prefer not to have your septum punctured at this period. The good news is for people suffering from hay fever however, as Lamb has told us that you’ll be that blowing out your nose “just right.” However, if you suffer from extreme allergies or are susceptible to sinus infections it’s best to steer clear of any septum piercings altogether.
  • Scarring and granulation tissue: “Granulation tissue, an enlargement of the skin that many mistake it for scar tissue. May form in the area of a nose piercing” Fenton says. “This is actually an over-reaction that is caused by the environmental conditions of the nose as well as the jewelry.” The scarring can also occur.

How to Change Out a Septum Piercing

How to Change Out a Septum Piercing

Although you may use a septum to pierce out according to what Fenton stated. You should take at least a year before replacing the jewellery. It is possible to visit your piercer once more after the first time you swap. The benefit of septum puncture is that, with the correct jewellery (usually an oblong barbell) it is easily hidden by flipping the piece upside down. Size of piece as well as the balls on the ends can hinder your ability to breathe through your nose when doing it, but you should keep that in your head. A septum retainer can solve that issue, but it’s very attractive when it’s visible.

What Type of Jewelry is Used for Septum Piercings?

  • Clicker Septum: These hoops have a hinged closing that opens and closes with a click for simple installation and removal. Closed hoops usually have different stones and other decorative elements along the outside which makes them ideal for personalizing.
  • Barbell: Circular bars fit perfectly into a septum piercing and permits. This simple flip-up technique to conceal it without taking off the jewelry.

What Jewelry Material Is Used for Septum Piercing?

  • stainless steel: This one of the most safest choices of metal for piercings because it’s hypoallergenic.
  • Titanium: Another well-liked choice for nose rings is Titanium. Which isn’t likely to trigger a reaction as well as being sturdy. Titanium is typically more expensive compared with other types of metals.
  • Niobium: If are extremely sensitive to metallic Niobium is a good option. The likelihood of having an reaction is very low and it tends to be somewhere in the middle of price.